Guest Post: The Weakening Definition of Diversity

Guest Post: The Weakening Definition of Diversity

What qualifies as a “diverse” workplace? Does it mean that employees are of a variety of different races and genders? Or does it mean they’ve had a variety of life experiences?

This article, written by Gillian B. White – a senior associate editor at The Atlantic – gives an interesting take on the how the evolving view of what diversity means in the workplace is impacting American business. This evolving view comes from the perspective of Millennial’s, and it questions whether this view of diversity meaning more than just demographics benefits those who have been disenfranchised in the business world – such as women and minorities.

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This is a departure from what older generations understand diversity to mean. “Millennials frame diversity as a means to a business outcome, which is in stark contrast to older generations that view diversity through the lens of morality (the right thing to do), compliance, and equality,” the study of more than 3,700 individuals spanning different generations, races, and genders found. According to Christie Smith, one of the study’s authors, this generation is already comfortable with the idea of diversity in a traditional sense and they’re looking to expand the definition, which could be a good thing.

Read the entire article here.

 

Does Your Business Cater to Diversity?

Does Your Business Cater to Diversity?

catertodiversityA white marketing executive from Atlanta was fired because of his Facebook post that gathered racist comments from his friends. Kudos to the company, Polaris Marketing Group, where this man worked! They clearly know that one of the greatest aspects in growing a business is having a team who has respect for each other and for others. Congratulations to them because they fought and won the battle against inequality and discrimination! They are a company with the reputation of a business which values people regardless of color.

On the other hand, the situation is a little frustrating. Even in these da
ys as we believe slavery is a thing of the past, we are still dealing with the consequences of the mark left by those now ancient times. Some people are still mistreated. Ignorant people are still on the loose. There are those who still don’t know how to take full responsibility for what they do – and social media opens the doors for the crazies to rampantly run their mouths.
So here’s the story, in case you haven’t already heard: The Facebook post consisted of a photo the perpetrator had taken with a black three year old kid in the background, who just so happened to be the son of his co-worker, Sydney Shelton. His name is Gerod Roth – whose Facebook profile was Geris Hilton and is now deactivated. After his post went viral and was subjected to negative attention, Mr. Roth claimed his words were taken out of context, and that it is not only the kid who was victimized – he had also been targeted. He wrote a letter of apology to his coworker, however, it was too little too late. Her son had already been bullied online, called names, ridiculed, and hurt. What is more painful to me is that, it was just a three year old kid who was subjected to this kind of inhumane acts.

This is the era of speedy things – internet, technological innovations, spread of news, action of the government to a problem, reaction of people to situations, etc. People need to remember to be more mindful of what they do because it is not easy – actually it is nearly impossible with the internet – to take things back. And it is there for everyone to see: the media, future employers, and potential customers or clients.
This is not the first story of an employee getting fired because of racial posts. A Filipino nurse in Singapore was also fired because of posting offensive comments against Singaporeans.

Read more about that story here: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/tan-tock-seng-hospital-fires-filipino-nurse-who-made-offensive-comments-on-facebook

Many accounts of this kind of story exist, and some serve as a clear indication that our businesses are becoming more considerate in the well-being of its members regardless of color, gender preference, language, or status in life. It means that they are open to diversity.

Is your idea of a business one that will cater to a diversified group of people? Let us know by commenting below!

 

Source: http://www.fox5atlanta.com/news/30427294-story

Guest Blog: The New Face of Corporate Activism

Guest Blog: The New Face of Corporate Activism

While we like the sound of our own voice here at The Idea Inc, every week we want to showcase the voices of other bloggers or articles we think do a good job of conveying an important message to business. We are a company that loves to work with businesses that have a purpose and much of the time that means some sort of social activism may come into play. This article looks at the face of corporate activism, and shares some interesting points on how that face is changing and how corporations can use it to their advantage. It is a very interesting read, and definitely worth your time.

The New Face of Corporate Activism (link to full article below):

Illustration by Mike Reddy

Illustration by Mike Reddy

From the Arab Spring to the protests in Baltimore, social movements have become a pervasive feature of contemporary society. Moreover, activists are increasingly targeting companies and even nonprofits. Although this environment creates new challenges for business, it also presents an opportunity for social intrapreneurs to change their companies for the better, from the inside out. – See more at: http://ssir.org/articles/entry/the_new_face_of_corporate_activism#sthash.VXQtl5aU.dpuf