Guest Post: The Weakening Definition of Diversity

Guest Post: The Weakening Definition of Diversity

What qualifies as a “diverse” workplace? Does it mean that employees are of a variety of different races and genders? Or does it mean they’ve had a variety of life experiences?

This article, written by Gillian B. White – a senior associate editor at The Atlantic – gives an interesting take on the how the evolving view of what diversity means in the workplace is impacting American business. This evolving view comes from the perspective of Millennial’s, and it questions whether this view of diversity meaning more than just demographics benefits those who have been disenfranchised in the business world – such as women and minorities.

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This is a departure from what older generations understand diversity to mean. “Millennials frame diversity as a means to a business outcome, which is in stark contrast to older generations that view diversity through the lens of morality (the right thing to do), compliance, and equality,” the study of more than 3,700 individuals spanning different generations, races, and genders found. According to Christie Smith, one of the study’s authors, this generation is already comfortable with the idea of diversity in a traditional sense and they’re looking to expand the definition, which could be a good thing.

Read the entire article here.

 

A Tribute to Women in Business

A Tribute to Women in Business

I’m just at the cusp of a turning point
Where the sway in my hips is a symbol of strength
And not an act of trying too hard
Physically, a woman is strongest at that point in her body
It is the center of her being, but
We’ve still got our minds and our mouths
And don’t forget our hearts
It is the combination of these aspects of ourselves
That make us feel the most centered
This is the essence of who we are, our beauty
And though the world may put all sorts of labels on us
We are the ones who define our selves
So despite the world’s attempt to limit our abilitiesYSWBX4I5PP
Or more importantly, the belief that we are able
I embrace the labels:

Sexy. Promiscuous. Fat. Quiet. Ambitious. Brave.
Smart. Pretty. Skinny. Black. Loud. Emotional. Tall.
White. Scared. Weak. Healthy. Victim. Unique.
Fabulous. Confusing. Dramatic. Understanding.

Accepting ourselves and living our lives despite our flaws
Is the closest we will get to perfection.

Dear reader,

I hope you enjoyed the writing. I wanted to do an alternative post this week. A tribute to women. Our theme this month is Expression, and my favorite form of this is through poetry. It serves as a reminder that while I’m a business woman who works with other wonderful business women on a daily basis, we are all very multifaceted. To put it plainly, there’s levels to being phenomenal. Being in business means connecting with people from different backgrounds and different perspectives.

Yet, I don’t think we operate at our full potential until we master our own self. That means owning up to and improving our shortcomings, and perfecting our strengths. As a woman, it means triumphing over the stereotypes and realizing that women are the most untapped resource in the world.

Earlier this year it was revealed that the United States is the top country for women entreprenuers. You can read more on the article here. While that is wonderful news, the article admits that there is still much room for development in that there needs to be equitable access to resources for women to pursue entrepreneurial ventures, starting with education.

So I challenge women to take on the challenge of uplifting, accepting, and motivating each to charter the path of change.

Source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/247767